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St. Ives and Contexts 1901-2008


14 October - 8 November, 2008

The Cornish harbour town of St Ives has been drawing artists for centuries. Turner, Whistler, and Sickert all visited in the nineteenth century, and by 1901, where our exhibition starts, the town was fully established as an ‘artists’ colony’. Artists such as John Anthony Park, represented here by some deft pencil drawings capturing nautical life in and around the harbour, came from far and wide to study at the painting schools – from Lancashire to study at Julius Olsson’s School of Landscape and Marine Painting in Park’s case. Sail lofts could be easily and cheaply converted into light, spacious studios, while a rich variety of natural settings – from prehistoric moorland to sheer granite cliffs – and a thriving working harbour offered plentiful subjects for compositions. Moreover, the exceptional qualities of the light on the promontory, created by a combination of the whiteness of the sand and the exposure to the ocean on all sides, were a noted selling point to artists from the beginning.

St Ives was not alone in West Penwith: the colony there in fact developed slightly later than Newlyn, on the south coast, to which Stanhope Forbes and Frank Bramley were drawing many other artists by the 1880s. Among the second wave of Newlyn artists came Lamorna Birch, whose shimmering watercolours here are of the coast by the cove after which he named himself; and Laura Knight, who moved nearby with her husband Harold, and created shimmering impressionism en plein air long before her better-known portraits of bohemian London life. She continued to visit Cornwall as a refuge from city life, as the calm pencil drawing 'Evening Pool' from 1960 here testifies.

Modernism was part native, part created in St Ives when Christopher Wood and Ben Nicholson were struck by Alfred Wallis, showing his paintings on the doorstep of his Back Road West cottage in 1928. The retired seaman was entirely self-taught as a painter, and had begun to paint simply to relieve his loneliness after his wife had died. For him to paint was to relive his seafaring days, and to capture scenes he felt were rapidly disappearing. This sense of transience was perfectly matched by his means: he painted in ships' paint, emulsion, pencil and crayon, on scraps of old wood and cardboard. His unfussy immediacy represented to Nicholson and Wood a new aesthetic; and most interestingly, Wallis brought to painting a unique outlook, free from the conventions of perspective, often encompassing many different views within a single picture. Both Nicholson and Wood drew inspiration, aligning Wallis with modernism’s primitive urge, whilst Nicholson in particular developed what he perceived as a sophistication of complex multiple perspectives that extended the project of the Cubists. Wood on the other hand died tragically young, yet succeeded in creating a brilliantly personal vision, fusing the rawness he had witnessed in Wallis’s paintings with an expressionist sense of heightened reality. As his masterful drawing of a woman here demonstrates, his brilliance as a draftsman was to be disarmingly direct, whilst always inviting sustained scrutiny, ultimately revealing personal, sometimes disturbing, depths.

Nicholson moved down to St Ives from Hampstead with Barbara Hepworth in 1939, and encouraged friends such as the Russian Constructivist Naum Gabo to follow. The presence of these pioneering modernists attracted likeminded younger artists; by the end of the War the modernist presence was so strong that these so-called ‘advanced’ artists felt the need to exhibit apart from the more conservative St Ives Society of Artists, who had little time for abstraction. In 1949 the tensions had mounted to such an extent that an irreparable rupture occurred, and the Penwith Society was formed, offering far greater freedom to abstract artists.

St Ives native Peter Lanyon, who went on to change the face of British landscape painting, was introduced to the possibilities of working with abstraction in three dimensions by Gabo. Terry Frost, who moved to St Ives in 1950, was encouraged by Nicholson, and inspired by his approach to geometry, as well as working as assistant to Hepworth for several years. After moving permanently to Zennor, just along the coast, in 1956, Patrick Heron too became instrumental in bringing many artists, both prominent and promising, to the town; he also repeatedly placed St Ives, and Modern British Art in general, on the international stage through his art criticism, and in his readiness to embrace the seismic American developments of the 1950s, most notably Abstract Expressionism.

Aside from living and working in the area, engagement with the rich and varied surrounding landscape of West Penwith has been one of the consistent strata to the rather loose artistic label ‘St Ives’. Abstraction often joined in a duet with the genres of landscape, still life, or nude. Terry Frost’s geometry takes on nuances of the harbour; we see here Michael Canney at the fascinating midway point between his early representation and mature constructivism; Lanyon’s gestural abstraction constantly engages with landscape and the human figure; and Karl Weschke, later renowned for his stark figures in barren landscapes, here is shown in best 1950s fashion brooding on the midway point between the land and the spirit.

Of course some of the artists who have worked in and around the town have balked at the label ‘St Ives artists’ or ‘St Ives School’, which can seem to imply some common aesthetic; in many cases they rightly protest against the ubiquitous tendency of reducing art to movements. The extraordinary thing about the artists working in St Ives for most of the period, though, is their sheer diversity. From the 1940s through to the 1970s, all the major styles and movements in Modern British art were well represented.

There are still artists from the heyday who are rising in reputation as more of their work comes to the light and is studied. Bryan Ingham, master etcher, for example, worked in relative obscurity, despite being an instructor and assistant to many of the more famous artists who wanted to etch. Today, though, he is being celebrated in his own right for his powerful vision that derives from the Cubists via Ben Nicholson. Kate Nicholson, daughter of Ben and Winifred, was prolific in the 60s, and widely exhibited, but her work has today become rare, though no less highly valued for its brilliantly subtle explorations of light and space. Also included in this exhibition are some of the artists with associations, who visited rather than were based in Cornwall: the sculptor and printmaker Robert Adams, for example, who contributed to the Penwith Portfolio that raised funds for the Penwith Galleries; and Henry Cliffe, painter, printmaker, and sculptor, who taught at Corsham alongside Lanyon, Roger Hilton, and William Scott.

The re-opening of the Leach Pottery this year is a landmark in both the preservation of St Ives’s artistic landmarks and the regeneration of its resources. Shown here are some of the finest examples of the pottery’s Standardware from its heyday; we are also proud to have a large selection of pots freshly thrown by Trevor Corser, the last remaining potter at the Pottery’s closure in 2005. Chris Prindl, on the other hand, represents a Japanese influence aside from Leach: he studied Japanese pottery first in America, then later in Japan itself, finally setting up his own pottery near Lostwithiel in 1996.

After having been such a rich centre for artistic diversity and trend-setting in the pre- and post-war years, St Ives suffered something of a lull when the art world went Pop and Op, and when Roger Hilton, Barbara Hepworth, and Bryan Wynter all died in the mid-seventies. Whilst critical interest in the prior periods endured, it was felt by some that St Ives by the late 1970s, with the exception perhaps of Patrick Heron, no longer had its finger on the pulse. Yet the past two decades, largely through the establishment of Tate St Ives in 1993, have seen a renewed surge both in artistic production and in assessment: the recent survey by the critic and painter Peter Davies – whose view of St Ives from Man’s Head is included in the show – for example, demonstrated just what a vivid artistic scene there has been from the 1970s to the present. Sandra Blow, the brilliant late modernist who had first visited in the 1950s, returned to live and work in the town in 1994, a move which did much to boost its international reputation.

The contemporary artists shown here forge fresh connections with the land, whilst keeping traditions alive. Both Biddy Picard and Heather Bray lead on from the ‘naïve’ styles initiated by Alfred Wallis and Bryan Pearce, sharing also subtle approaches to colour and form that nonetheless remain distinct, immediately identifiable as their own. Eric Ward’s glorious harbour scenes are reminiscent, but never derivative, of the oils of John Anthony Park. Michael Strang’s impressionism perfectly captures the constantly changing lights and weathers of the Cornish coast; and Linda Weir’s animated style conveys a town always bustling with activity, both human and climatic.

Peter Maber


Robert Adams. Untitled

Robert Adams (British, 1917-1984)
Untitled
screenprint in colours
signed, numbered 22/50 and dated 1965 in pencil
80.7 x 57.7cm.
£850

Adams was one of the most prominent post-war British abstract artists alongside Victor Pasmore, Kenneth and Mary Martin, Adrian Heath, Roger Hilton, Terry Frost, Anthony Hill and William Scott. In 1949 Adams began teaching at the Central School of Art and Design in London, where he came into contact with Victor Pasmore and his circle, which acted as a forum for Constructivist ideas in Britain; Adams exhibited with them from 1951 to 1956, working mainly in metal sculpture. Unlike the rest of the group, however, he rejected both mathematical formulae and new materials in sculpture. Many of his works were in wood and were based on organic forms. He was nevertheless sympathetic to the group's aim of forging a link between art and architecture.

While teaching at the Central School Adams learnt how to weld and in 1955 began to produce constructions of sheet and rod elements, as in 'Tall Spike Forms', which showed the influence of González and a move towards non-figuration. His work of the 1960s often used welded steel sheets, sometimes perforated, as in Large Screen Form (1962; London, Tate). These were ideally to be displayed against a well-lit background so as to allow light to shine through - one can clearly trace the influence of such works on this screenprint. Though he never lived in Cornwall, he visited and enjoyed good relations with many of the contemporary St Ives artists, sharing with many of them a provisional approach to Constructivism. He contributed to the 'Penwith Portfolio' of 1973 to raise funds for the Penwith Galleries.

References: Robert Adams (exh. cat. by A. Hill, London, Gimpel Fils, 1951)
L. Alloway: Nine Abstract Artists (London, 1954), pp. 21–2.


Ray Barry. Untitled Abstract

Ray Barry (British, b. 1931)
Abstract Composition
Acrylic on card
Signed
15 x 9 cm.
£100

Ray Barry was born in 1931 and studied at Falmouth College of Art. He is a prominent member of the St Ives Society of Artists, and has been both working colleague and friend to many other St Ives artists; he had a solo show at the Mariners’ Gallery in St Ives in April 2007.
Barry comments:

“Although my work is generally non-referential, harbour or landscape motifs often find their way into the structure, forming mosaics, influenced by stained glass, with rich elements of colour and texture. On my ‘journey’, in search of perception and responsiveness to life, I use changing techniques such as translucency, over-painting and drawing, charcoal, rubbing, scratching, scumbling and occasionally collage. The result may not always please the viewer, but evidence of ‘the search’ is there."


Sandra Blow. Screenprint

Sandra Blow RA (British, 1925-2006)
Screenprint printed in 5 colours on Velin arches paper
signed and numbered 1/XX by the artist in pencil
one of 20 artist's proofs aside from the standard edition of 100
51.6 x 62cm.
Published by the Royal Academy in 2000.
The full sheet with margins and deckled edges in fine condition.

£950

Blow studied at St Martin's School of art in the 1940s, then at the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome. In Italy she became both the student and lover of Alberto Burri, and his use of unconventional 'found' materials and collage had a lasting effect on her work. In the 1950s she worked for a time in St Ives, and became a close friend of Roger Hilton. She returned to St Ives from London in the nineties, painting from an enormous studio at the top of the town with views out over the bay. Her work tempers geometry with organic forms and a spontaneous sense of improvisation; she has stated her aim as being a dialogue with nature.


Heather Bray. The Tin Mug

Heather Bray (British)
The tin mug
Gouache on card
signed, titled on reverse
20 x 25cm. White wood frame.

SOLD


Heather Bray is a largely self-taught artist, and has been painting for 20 years. Her views of Cornish harbours are characterised by a sensitivity to colour and simplicity of form, achieving subtle balances and a distinctive sense of unity. The greatest influence on her work has been the paintings of Alfred Wallis and Bryan Pearce.


Heather Bray. Hot Chocolate and Apricots

Heather Bray (British)
Hot chocolate and apricots
Gouache on card
signed, titled on reverse
20 x 25cm. White wood frame.

SOLD



Heather Bray. Taking a Break

Heather Bray (British)
Taking a break
Gouache on card
signed, titled on reverse
24 x 32cm. White wood frame.

£400



Heather Bray. High Tide

Heather Bray (British)
High Tide
Gouache on card
signed, titled on reverse
24 x 32cm. White wood frame.

SOLD


Michael Canney. Untitled abstract composition



Michael Canney (British, 1923-1999)

Untitled (abstract composition)
gouache on paper c. 1958
estate stamped to reverse of frame
3½ x 4¼ in., 9 x 11 cm. Framed in wood.

Provenance: Estate of the artist

£1,150

The small gouache, 'Untitled', from the late 50s, marks the formative time when Canney's mature style began to emerge. The painting extends his engagement with Cezanne and the Cubists, rendering space ambiguous, without clear points of focus. Instead, the various overlapping shapes project and recede, complementing each other in contour and chromaticism, but jostling and competing for the foreground. There is the sense of improvisation around given forms, a softening of his constructivist impulses. The work is strikingly similar in palette and philosophy, if not in scale, to the contemporary work of Roger Hilton, with whom he was closely associated at this time. In particular, the wandering lines which extend the shapes' contours and offer a counterpoint to the blocks of colour, are a device used contemporaneously by Hilton; so too are the suggestions of the lines and shapes of the body thrown up by these abstract forms.


Henry Cliffe. Abstract Figure



Henry Cliffe (British, 1919-1983)
Untitled (abstract figure)
gouache on paper
executed circa 1955
23 x 15¾ in., 58.5 x 40 cm. In textured grey wooden frame.

Provenance: Private Collection, London.

£1,450
(framed)

Cliffe came into contact with many of the 'St Ives School' artists during his time at Corsham, in particular Peter Lanyon and Roger Hilton. 'Untitled (Abstract Figure)' shares with Hilton's work of the time an abstracting of the body into loosely geometric proportions and a flattening of the figure that makes depth the job of colour and texture. This painting also shows an awareness of contemporary American trends, in particular de Kooning's abstract expressionist treatments of the female body, that radically distort, placing an emphasis on painterly animation of the surface.


Henry Cliffe. Hera



Henry Cliffe (British, 1919-1983)
Hera
colour lithograph, printed in black, red, orange and violet
signed, dated and numbered from the edition of 50
57 x 80 cm (sheet). White box frame.

850



Trevor Corser. Porcelain pot


Trevor Corser (British, b. 1891-1939)

Ceramics

Peter Davies. Porthmeor Waves

Peter Davies (British, b. 1953)
Porthmeor Waves
Oil on Board
1992
19 x 32.5 cm. In white wooden framed.

Exhibitied: Bridewell Studios, Liverpool, 1992; Graham Gallery, Tonbridge Wells, 1993; Living Room Gallery, Greenwich, 1994.

£295

This delicate and understated oil painting takes as its subject one of the most famous views of St Ives, looking out from Man's Head over Porthmeor beach to the Island and Godrevy lighthouse. The view has been painted so many times before, probably most famously by Christopher Wood. But Davies' painting is fresh and unburdened by its associations; he makes the vista all his own, whilst subtly alluding to the 'naïve' styles associated with the origins of modern art in the artists' colony.

Peter Davies is best known as a writer on modern British art; he contributes regularly to The Independent and is the author of many monographs on artists, as well as the important reappraisal 'St Ives Revisited'. He is also an accomplished, perfectionist painter, whose works are scarce and much sought after.

Reference: David Buckman, Dictionary of Artists in Britain since 1945, p. 333.


Terry Frost. Sundrops




Sir Terry Frost (British, 1915-2003)
Sundrops
Lithograph in colours
1997
signed and numbered from edition of 40 by the artist in pencil
73 x 54.5 cm. (sheet).
In wooden frame.
£1,450

One of the best-loved figures in British art, Terry Frost was encouraged to paint in a prisoner-of-war camp by fellow prisoner and artist Adrian Heath. From 1947 to 1950 he attended the Camberwell School of Art, which, with Heath's studio, was the focal point of Constructivist tendencies in England. Frost followed their concern for proportion and systematic procedures but he soon rejected their insistence on pure abstraction. After moving down to St Ives in 1950 his work took on the qualities of his new surroundings. He worked as an assistant to Barbara Hepworth for a while, before taking up a teaching position at the University of Leeds. He returned to St Ives in 1956 but spent the decade from 1964 teaching at Reading University, before settling back at Newlyn in 1974.


Terry Frost. Untitled Screenprint




Sir Terry Frost (British, 1915-2003)
untitled screenprint in 10 colours on Velin arches paper
signed and numbered 1/XX by the artist in pencil
one of 20 artist's proofs aside from the standard edition of 100 published by the Royal Academy in 2000.
64.5 x 51.2 cm. (sheet).
In wooden frame.
SOLD


Barbara Hepworth. Gleaming Stone



Dame Barbara Hepworth CBE (British, 1903-1975)
Gleaming Stone
Original Lithograph printed in colours
1973
31 x 20 cm.
Edition of 150, to accompany the limited edition book Stones by Paul Merchant, this from one of 75 copies which were signed on the colophon by the author and artist.

SOLD
 

Barbara Hepworth. Kestor Rock



Dame Barbara Hepworth CBE (British, 1903-1975)
Kestor Rock
Original Lithograph printed in colours
1973
31 x 20 cm.
Edition of 150, to accompany the limited edition book Stones by Paul Merchant, this from one of 75 copies which were signed on the colophon by the author and artist.

SOLD
 

Patrick Heron. Katharine: Christmas 1976



Patrick Heron CBE (British, 1920-1999)
Katharine: Christmas 1976
From the Shapes of Colour portfolio, 1978
Screenprint in colour on cream Velin Arches paper
Signed
Edition of 50
Additional screenprint with abstract figures to reverse of sheet
90 x 170mm. (image); 505 x 355mm. (sheet).

White box frame.

Published by Kelpra Editions, Waddington and Tooth Graphics

Reference: Patrick Heron (Byatt, Gayford and Sylvester), Tate Gallery, 1988: p. 164.

£1,650

Patrick Heron became a key figure in St Ives after his permanent move down in the 1950s, although he had previously been active in the town in working as a designer for his father's firm, Cresta Silks (1935-9, 1944-50), and in assisting at Bernard Leach's pottery (1944-5). Heron was influenced first and foremost by Braque and Matisse, and worked in a figurative medium until 1955. The first exhibition of American Abstract Expressionism held at the Tate in 1956 was also instrumental in his work as from then on his work became abstract. This change in his work coincided with his move to Zennor, where the garden in full bloom inspired a series of paintings. From 1957 he embarked on stripe paintings, both horizontal and vertical, suggestive of the Cornish coastline. From the 1960s he concentrated on simple forms such as rectangles and a repertory of distinctive shapes that emphasized decorative values and contrasts of saturated colour. In the 1970s he favoured large surfaces of colour painted with small Japanese brushes, with improvisatory shapes that have been compared to the coves and rock formations of the Cornish coast. The 1980s saw a series of more informal abstractions that hinted once again at landscape associations (e.g. Pale Garden Painting, 1984; see Patrick Heron, Barbican Art Gallery, 1985 exh. cat. p. 45). A retrospective of his work was held at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in 1972 and at the Barbican in 1985. In 1980 Heron was created a CBE and was also made a trustee of the Tate Gallery.


Ken Howard. Figures on the Beach, Mousehole



Ken Howard RA (British, b. 1932)
Figures on the Beach, Mousehole
Oil on board
signed
20.5 x 26cm.

SOLD


Bryan Ingham. Hebdon Bridge



Bryan Ingham (British, 1936-1997)
Hebdon Bridge
Etching on wove paper
signed and numbered from edition of 75
19 x 23cm. (pl.); 27.5 x 33.5 cm. (sheet)

SOLD

Bryan Ingham was born in Preston, and studied first at St Martin’s School of Art in the 1950s, then at the RCA in the early sixties; he travelled extensively in Italy and completed his training at the British Academy in Rome.

Ingham then moved down to Cornwall and became inextricably linked with the St Ives School of painters. He became greatly influenced by Ben Nicholson, whilst retaining his European influences, above all Picasso and Juan Gris. Synthetic Cubism became increasingly important in his exploration of painterly space: he made relief paintings, and experimented frequently with collage; his constant devotion to the medium of etching was in some ways a logical extension of his explorations of painterly space. He was always a distinctly contemporary artist however, being compared to Schwitters and Rauschenberg.

He lived in an isolated cottage on the Lizard Peninsula, where the untamed beauty of the landscape became a constant source of inspiration. Though in some ways isolationist, he was a prominent teacher in St Ives, and his mastery of etching meant he was much in demand. He also continued to travel widely in Europe, living at one stage in Germany.

His work is held in numerous public and private collections, including the Ashmolean and the V&A. There was a major retrospective of his work at the Fine Art Society in 2006.


Bryan Ingham. Flowers in vase



Bryan Ingham (British, 1936-1997)
Landscape with Flowers in Vase
mixed technique etching with embossing and pen and ink
32.5 x 47.5 cm. (plate). In grey wooden frame.

£650


Bryan Ingham. Jolly Town



Bryan Ingham (British, 1936-1997)
Jolly Town
etching with aquatint (unique proof aside from edition of 16 with other colours)
8 x 8.5 inches (irregular). In wooden frame.

£650

Bryan Ingham. Beach Forms



Bryan Ingham (British, 1936-1997)
Beach Forms
etching (unique)
14 x 15cm. Framed in ebonised wood.

£420

Bryan Ingham. Landscape Forms



Bryan Ingham (British, 1936-1997)
Landscape Forms
etching with tone (no recorded edition)
11 x 14cm (irregular).
Framed in ebonised wood.

SOLD



Laura Knight. Evening Pool



Dame Laura Knight RA (British, 1877-1970)
Evening Pool
Charcoal on paper
1960
signed titled and dated
34.4 x 25.5cm.
Framed in wood.

£1,250

Laura Knight was one of the most prominent British artists of the early twentieth century, and a leading figure in the second generation of the Newlyn School of artists. She rose to fame after her move to London having studied at Nottingham College of art. In London she exhibited regularly at the Royal Academy, painting above all the ballet and the circus. After having spent a time in different artistic communes she moved to Newlyn and Lamorna, Cornwall, with her husband, the painter Harold Knight, between 1907 and 1919. They then returned to London, but kept on her Lamorna studio. In Cornwall her work turned to expressive landscape painting and drawing; these are among her most sought-after works.


Samuel John Lamorna Birch. Sailing boat off Lamorna



Samuel John Lamorna Birch RA (British, 1869-1955)
Sailing boat off Lamorna
c. 1910
watercolour and gouache on board
signed
19 x 27.5 cm.
Painted wood and gilt frame.

£1,050


Birch was born in Cheshire, and moved down to the Lamorna Valley, on the south coast of West Penwith, in 1892, attracted by the beauty of the landscape and the nearby presence of the 'Newlyn School' artists, adopting the name of his new abode at the suggestion of Stanhope Forbes. He studied briefly in Paris, but was largely self-taught. Birch's devotion to this region of Cornwall became legendary, and his presence attracted many other artists: Laura and Harold Knight, Alfred Munnings and Frank Gascoigne Heath all moved down, creating in effect a second group of Newlyn School artists (the first had begun in the 1880s with Forbes) that came to be known as the 'Lamorna Group'.

Birch achieved wide renown, exhibiting over 200 works at the Royal Academy, and was elected Royal Academician in 1932. He had a solo show at the Fine Art Society in 1906. A 2004 show at Warrington Museum and Art Gallery, 'Shades of British Impressionism: Lamorna Birch and his Circle', offered an important retrospective. Comparable works to the present two watercolours are held in the Tate Collections, most notably 'Seascape'.

These two works show Birch at the height of his powers, painting his greatest subject, Lamorna Cove. They demonstrate his mastery of qualities of light, and his nuanced rendering of the many moods of the ocean: its playful iridescence, gentle agitation, the momentary crashing of a wave, and the glassy rippling as it reaches the shore. He adds volume and texture to the watercolours with overpainted touches of oil paint, using techniques such as rapid brush strokes and even finger-wipes to convey a sense of rapidity; in the case of the breaker in 'Fishermen in Lamorna', he has opened out into the board beneath, in a sudden textural flash akin to the shock of the spray. Birch demonstrates in these paintings too his mastery of placement: the sailing boat on the horizon, and fishermen on the rocks create a sense of scale, and give definition to the compositions.


Samuel John Lamorna Birch. Fishermen in Lamorna




Samuel John Lamorna Birch RA (British, 1869-1955)
Fishermen in Lamorna
c. 1910
Watercolour and oil on board
signed, titled on reverse
27 x 38 cm.
Painted wood and gilt frame.

£1,550



Peter Lanyon. Nude (Study for Europa)




Peter Lanyon (British, 1918-1964)
Nude
(Study for Europa)
c. 1954
Gouache on brown paper, laid down to board
signed in pencil
50 x 34 cm.

Condition: The work has been painted on brown paper and laid down to board, probably by the artist. Whilst this has led to some losses and rippling of the paper, the presentation is in keeping with Lanyon’s aesthetic of spontaneity and of naturalness. Presented in a grey wooden frame.

£3,200


The relationship between the human body and landscape was one of the principal concerns that emerged in Lanyon’s mature work, and the 1954 painting 'Europa' was his first large-scale canvas to fully realise a synthesis between the landscape and the body. Not only had Lanyon fused the traditional modes of landscape and nude, but he had also created a painting which steered a middle course between representation and abstraction.

The present painting relates to the series of drawings and paintings Lanyon made of the female nude prior to this great work. He experimented with twisting the body into unconventional poses, and this vertical arrangement, with the head at the base of the painting, was one he tried several times (in 'Drawing for Europa' and 'Nude' (both 1954)). This configuration allowed Lanyon to experiment with his interest in ambiguous perspectives: it is not quite clear from the vertical foreshortening whether the painter is situated behind a supine model’s head, or whether an imaginary inversion has taken place, abstracted from the reality. The painting is characteristic in its fast, gestural brushstrokes, and corresponds with 'Nude' (1954) in its use of wandering dark strokes over a flattened lighter base to explore bodily contours; such overpainted contours are found throughout Lanyon's mature work, indicating motion as well as defining by outline. The present work reaches an intense climax in the lighter grey swirling at the head that synthesises the dark grey and white of the body, producing a painterliness that is closer to abstraction than to a rendition of hair. This moment is comparable to the agitated circular climaxes of 'Thermal' and 'Rosewall' (1960).

References:
Andrew Causey, Peter Lanyon: Paintings, Drawings and Constructions, p. 34.
Margaret Garlake, The Drawings of Peter Lanyon, pp. 61-2.


Peter Lanyon. Dog with Scarf




Peter Lanyon
(British, 1918-1964)
Dog with Scarf
1947
Mixed media on paper
signed, titled and dated to reverse of sheet
16.5 x 21 cm. Framed in textured wood.

There is some surface creasing with minor losses to corners of sheet.

£1,650


Bernard Leach. Coastal Landscape, Japan




Bernard Leach (British, 1887-1979)
Coastal Landscape, Japan
Etching on wove paper
signed and dated 1918 in the plate
20.5 x 30.5cm. (pl.); 28.5 x 39cm. (sheet).
Framed in ebonised wood.

£650

This etching by the renowned potter Bernard Leach was printed by Janet Leach following her husband's death in an edition of around 25. This was the only edition. Bernard Leach studied etching at the London School of Art under Frank Brangwyn, and excelled in the medium, producing a series of fine etchings both in England and when he first arrived in Japan.


Bernard Leach. The Sea




Bernard Leach (British, 1887-1979)
The Sea
Etching on wove paper
numbered from the edition of 25 by Janet Leach (the potter's wife)
7 x 10cm (plate); 15 x 17cm (sheet).

£420

This etching by the renowned potter Bernard Leach was printed by Janet Leach following her husband's death in an edition of around 25. This was the only edition.


Bernard Leach. Z Bowl


Bernard Leach (British, 1887-1979)

Ceramics


Richard Long. A Double drawing of a Cornish Slate




Richard Long RA (British, b. 1945)
A Double Drawing of a Cornish Slate 1995
7 colour screenprint on somerset satin paper
signed and inscribed GSL I. (Gresham Studios, archival example)
59 x 112 cm. (unframed sheet). Dark wooden frame.
SOLD


The sculptor, photographer, painter, and 'land artist' Richard Long has worked on various projects in Cornwall, including several of his photographed walks and installations of stones at Tate St Ives. Cornish slate fascinates him, and he has used the slate from Delabole quarry in numerous pieces. This screenprint takes the classic Long format of text coupled with natural illustration, here a very fine screenprint of a rubbing taken from a slate sample.


John Minton. Mevagissey




John Minton (British, 1917-1957)
The Harbour, Mevagissey
pencil, black ink and wash
c. 1948
36.8 x 27.3 cm; 14.5 x 10.75 inches. Wooden frame.
£2,250


John Minton made frequent visits to Cornwall to visit his poet friends, W.S. Graham and Nessie Dunsmuir. In the summer of 1944 he spent six weeks with them at Germoe in their two gypsy caravans. He returned to Cornwall on numerous occasions, once bringing with him his close London companions Robert Colquhoun and Robert MacBryde, a later time bringing Keith Vaughan. In March 1948 he visited Nessie Dunsmuir at Mevagissey where she had moved into a cottage with Graham in 1947. Graham and Dunsmuir had recently agreed to separate for a time, and Graham had travelled to the States to give a series of lectures on British Literature at New York University.

Minton enjoyed a lively correspondence with Graham, in which painting and poetry were the two most common topics. Though Graham was away during Minton’s Mevagissey stay, he had recently embarked upon ‘The Nightfishing’, his first great poem, which he had begun to describe to Minton. Graham had been inspired by fishing trips he had joined with working crews during his first months in the harbour town. ‘The Nightfishing’, whilst far more than the ostensible description of a night’s fishing expedition in its allegorical dimensions, owes a good deal to those experiences.

Minton in turn was inspired by Mevagissey, and produced a notable oil painting there, which is at present lost. This drawing may well relate to that oil, and is extremely scarce: very few of Minton’s Cornish paintings and studies survive. He described the impact the Cornish coast made upon him in a letter of 1944:
God how I love the land to stand and see it move in intricate perspectives to the heathaze of the gentle skyline, and there always the violence, the clear sharp violence of things living and growing and of being young walking the earth ... I love the sea, treacherous, cold, impersonal, caught by the moon and shifted in the giant tides, the waves breaking forever with the subtle cruelty of terrible indifference. (letter from John Minton to Judith Hollman, n.d. [Summer, 1944] quoted in Spalding p.76).
Though Minton stressed the violence of the landscapes, and of the world more generally, and though Graham’s poetry portrays the sea in a similar vein, Minton’s art seeks refuge from these turbulent forces, and captures moments of fleeting tranquillity, as in the present drawing of moored boats at ease in the peaceful low-tide harbour.


Kate Nicholson. Untitled (Coastal Light)




Kate Nicholson (British, b. 1929)
Untitled (Coastal Light)
1967
Watercolour and gouache
inscribed to the reverse
54 x 71cm. Beige painted wooden frame.

£1,450

Kate Nicholson, the daughter of Ben and Winifred Nicholson, was born in Bankshead, Cumbria, but is more closely associated with St Ives, which she visited with her parents as a child, and where she settled in 1956. She became a teacher, having studied art at Bath Academy between 1949 and 1954, but above all is known in her own right as an exceptionally talented and subtle painter. She joined the Penwith Society of Artists, renowned for its breakaway modernism, in which her father had played a key role, and despite her modest output was represented in the Arts Council tour 'Six Young Painters' in 1961, and has had solo shows at Waddington Galleries and the Marjorie Parr Gallery in London. Commercially available examples of her work are extremely scarce.

During her most productive decade, the 1960s, Nicholson's work became increasingly abstract, distilling elements of the landscape into primal essences, and foregrounding, like her mother, effects of light and colour. 'Untitled (Coastal Light)' recalls late Turner, in particular his 'Land's End' paintings of the 1830s. As is typical of Nicholson, the work depends upon the interplay of forces: of the contrasts between watercolour swathes and luminous strokes of gouache; and between rapid, thrown paint that runs, and thicker, opaque application that sits firm. The work is structured around the curve form, as well as around colour, moving out of the shadows to climax in the intensity of the yellows and ochre of the centre. As in Turner, there is the suggestion, perhaps, of waves breaking on rocks, and of sunlight breaking through cloud and rain; but the painting refuses to resolve itself, and remains powerfully subtle in its abstraction.


Breon O'Casey. Untitled



Breon O'Casey (British, b. 1928)
Untitled
Acrylic and collage on card
signed by the artist verso
18 x 13.5 cm; 7 x 5 inches. White box frame.

£620

Breon O'Casey is the son of the Irish playwright Sean O'Casey, and moved to St Ives in the 1950s, having been inspired by Alfred Wallis; he later described the town as his salvation. He worked as an assistant to Barbara Hepworth for several years, and sculpts himself, as well as painting, print-making, and for many years making jewellery. Previously he studied under Jacob Epstein at the Anglo-French Art Centre in London, as well as studying design at Dartington under the Bauhaus metalworker Naum Slutsky.

O'Casey's paintings and designs have been influenced by tribal art from around the world, including Africa, Oceania and South America. These two cards show one of his typical design forms, a double chevron; the application of coloured paper collage is equally typical, whilst also displaying a primitive urge, not unlike a child's delight in cutting-out and decorating, and recalling the later dicta of Picasso and Matisse.


John Anthony Park. St Ives Harbour




John Anthony Park ROI RBA (British, 1880-1962)
St Ives Harbour with Fishing Boats

c.1910
pencil on paper
signed
18.2 x 27.5 cm. Framed in oak.
£400


Perhaps the best known of the representational St Ives Painters, Park arrived in St Ives in 1899 having spent his youth working in the cotton mills of his native Lancashire, and within six years he was exhibiting at the Royal Academy. Park was encouraged in his painting by Julius Olsson, one of the foremost of the nineteenth-century artists who colonised St Ives, who founded a School of Landscape and Marine Painting overlooking Porthmeor Beach. Under Olsson’s guidance Park left to train in Paris in 1905, where he studied at the Atelier Colarossi, and where he was introduced to impressionism.

Returning to St Ives in 1923 Park rapidly established himself as the foremost naturalist painter of the fishing port, painting idyllic views of the old town and harbour that are so familiar to us today. He continued to exhibit at the Royal Academy until 1949, was elected member of the Royal Society of Oil Painters in 1923, helped to found the St Ives Society of Artists in 1927, and won gold medal at the Paris Salon in 1934. His work is held in many national institutions including the Tate and Manchester City Art Gallery.

This pencil drawing shows one of Park’s most typical views, St Ives Harbour with the bottom of Fore Street to the bottom of Fish Street. The drawing shows the wharf before it was paved in 1922. Park frequently filled sketchbooks with drawings, working confidently in the manner espoused by Olsson. These were often ideas for oil paintings, sometimes set down in charcoal and conté crayon or pencil. These were often quite structured and finished drawings which helped to give his eye the structure of the finished painting and a sense of texture.

References: Austin Wormleighton. John Anthony Park and the painters of light. St Ives 1900-1950. 1998.


John Anthony Park. St Ives Harbour




John Anthony Park ROI RBA (British, 1880-1962)
View of St Ives Harbour with Fishing Boats

c.1910
pencil on paper
signed
18.3 x 18.6 cm. Framed in oak.

£350


John Anthony Park. St Ives Fishing Boats




John Anthony Park ROI RBA (British, 1880-1962)
View of St Ives Fishing Boats

c.1910
pencil on paper
signed by the artist
12 x 15 cm. Framed in oak.

£350



Bryan Pearce. St. Ives Harbour




Bryan Pearce (British, 1929-2007)
St. Ives Harbour
Etching on wove paper
signed and dated '05, inscribed P/P. 1. (printer's proof)
Printed by Curwen Chilford
21.5 x 23.5 cm. (pl.); 30.5 x 32.5 cm. (sheet). Framed.

£450

Bryan Pearce was born in St Ives, and lived there throughout his life. He was diagnosed with Phenylketonuria during his childhood, a condition which affects the normal development of the brain. Encouraged by his mother who was herself a painter, and then by other St Ives artists, above all Peter Lanyon, he began drawing and painting in watercolours in 1953. From 1953 to 1957 he attended St Ives School of Painting under Leonard Fuller, and after this apprenticeship he began painting in oils and started to exhibit at the Penwith Gallery. He was elected member of the Penwith Society of Artists and was also a member of the Newlyn Society of Artists; his first solo show at Newlyn Gallery in 1959 was organized by Lanyon. Lanyon wrote of him: "Because his sources are not seen with a passive eye, but are truly happenings, his painting is original." Pearce has become one of the country's most popular 'naive' painters, well-known for his St Ives and other Cornish landscapes, which are often compared to those of Alfred Wallis. In the early 1970s Pearce began to make small etchings with the assistance of fellow artists Breon O'Casey and Bryan Ingham, and later Roy Walker. Since 1976 a number of his oil paintings have been made into limited edition high quality screenprints, in order to bring his distinctive images to a wider public.

Pearce worked slowly, but consistently, producing perhaps twelve oil paintings a year. Over the past 40 years he exhibited widely throughout the country, including at the New Art Centre, Victor Waddington Gallery and Stoppenbach & Delestre in London; Beaux Arts in Bath, Wills Lane Gallery in St Ives, and at the Oxford Museum of Modern Art. Public Collections include: the Tate Gallery, the Arts Council, the Contemporary Arts Society and Kettle's Yard, Cambridge.

 

Bryan Pearce. Shisha




Bryan Pearce (British, 1929-2007)
Shisha
Lithograph on wove paper
signed and dated '04, numbered from edition of 100
Printed by Curwen Chilford
15.5 x 15.5 cm. (pl.); 20 x 20 cm. (sheet). Framed.

£320



Jack Pender. Moored Boat



Jack Pender (British, 1918-1998)
Moored Boat
Watercolour and gouche
signed and dated '76
12.2 x 20cm. Limed box frame.

SOLD

Jack Pender was born and bred in Mousehole, the fishing village on the Southern Coast of West Penwith, and lived there for most of his life. His family were fishermen, but his grandfather took up painting on retirement, becoming a formative influence on the young Pender. Pender went on to study at Penzance School of Art, alongside Peter Lanyon, then at the West of England College of Art, Bristol under Paul Feiler, going on to teach at Plymouth Art School in 1950 before returning to Mousehole in 1956. He had numerous solo shows, including at the Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol, and the Newlyn Orien Gallery, and was the subject of three different BBC films in the 1970s. He was included in the major Tate retrospective of 1985, 'St Ives 1939-75', and had a retrospective at the Belgrave Gallery, London in 1990. He was the subject of a major retrospective in 2008 at Penlee House Gallery, Penzance.

Pender was a close friend of many of the other artists working in the St Ives area, including Terry Frost and Roger Hilton. Like them, he was interested in synthesising elements of landscape and figuration with abstraction; he wrote of being 'constantly aware of the interplay of space and solid, shape and colour, and of the relationship of boat to boat, to quay, to sea and to man.' His love for his harbour town was further reflected when he was appointed chairman of the Mousehole Harbour Authority.

'Moored Boat' is a fine demonstration of Pender's Constructivist bent, taking his typical subject of a boat but reducing the harbour scene to simplified planes of colour and achieving a geometric harmony in the mirroring of curves. This harmony of shape is matched by the chromatic harmony, which suggests a scene bathed in rosy evening light.

References: Irving Grose, 'Jack Pender', The Belgrave Gallery (1990), pp. 3-5.


Biddy Picard. West Penwith Landscape



Biddy Picard (British, b. 1922)
West Penwith Landscape
Mixed media on card
signed on reverse
c. 1970
45 x 63cm. With the artist's original black backboard in strong-grained wooden box frame.

£1,050

Biddy Picard arrived in Cornwall having hitched a lift on board a Welsh Crabber, and lived with her family first in Lamorna, in a gypsy caravan. Moving to Mousehole in the 1960s, she set up the Mousehole Pottery and Craftshop, and began painting and making stoneware sculptures. Her early abstract painting owed much to the contemporary work of William Scott, Paul Feiler and others working in Cornwall at the time, placing an emphasis on bold geometric patterning, softened by the textures and colours of the land. She began exhibiting with the Newlyn Society of Artists, as well as teaching at Penzance School of Art. By the end of the seventies she had moved from semi-abstraction to painting Cornish scenes of harbour life, albeit mostly imaginary. Her work has become highly sought after, and she had a major retrospective at the Great Atlantic Galleries in 2005.

'West Penwith Landscape' dates from the 1970s, when Picard taught at the Penzance School of Art. She began a series of mixed-media paintings in mottled brown hues, incorporating elements of monoprint, often based around the shapes of coastal rock formations. This painting hovers between landscape and abstraction. Echoes of the hilly headland and cliff appear to project beneath the landscape's surface: the metamorphosing forms suggest the subterranean strata of tin, and its mining in womb-like caverns, such as we find in the paintings of Peter Lanyon. But there is also the suggestion of boat forms in the lower right, and the reflected sun suggests the sea continues down the painting too - rendering those curves also coastal inlets.

References: Biddy Picard: A Life's Work, Great Atlantic Gallery, 2005.


Michael Strang. Porthmeor Beach and Tate



Michael Strang
(British)
Porthmeor Beach and Tate
Oil on board
1995
signed, signed and inscribed on reverse
10.5 x 15.5 cm.

£750

Painted for the 1995 Tate St. Ives "Porthmeor Beach: A Century of Images" exhibition.

Michael J. Strang studied under David Poole, Anthony Eyton and others at Wimbledon and Camberwell Schools. He has painted primarily in Cornwall since the 1970s, and had a show of 50 oils at Tate St Ives in 1995. He often paints en plein air, and there is a terrific momentum to his outdoor oils. His constant delight in colour and light is always apparent in his work; at times his vigour leads him into almost abstract renderings of the landscape. Increasingly he experiments with heavy forms of impasto, creating extraordinary textures that at times practically become three-dimensional artworks. He has exhibited at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, and his work is in numerous public collections worldwide.


Michael Strang. Porthmeor, St. Ives Sunset



Michael Strang
(British)
Porthmeor, St Ives Sunset
Oil on board
1995
signed and dated to reverse
10.5 x 15.5 cm.

£750

Painted for the 1995 Tate St. Ives "Porthmeor Beach: A Century of Images" exhibition.


Michael Strang. Morning Sun reflecting in Rockpool, Roskilly



Michael Strang
(British)
Morning Sun reflecting in Rockpool, Roskilly
Oil on board
2008
signed, inscribed and dated to reverse
30 x 25 cm.

£2,250


Michael Strang. Cornish Hedge, Castallack



Michael Strang
(British)
Cornish Hedge, Castallack
Oil on canvas
2007
signed and dated, additionally inscribed to reverse
41 x 30 cm.

£2,500


Michael Strang. Evening Star, Longrock Beach



Michael Strang
(British)
Evening Star, Longrock Beach
Oil on board
2004
signed, inscribed and dated to reverse
44 x 60 cm.

£4,000


Michael Strang. Longrock Beach, towards Penzance



Michael Strang
(British)
Longrock Beach, towards Penzance
Oil on board
2007
signed, inscribed and dated to reverse
61 x 92 cm.

£5,000


Alfred Wallis. Two Sailing Boats
recto

Alfred Wallis. Two Steamers
verso




Alfred Wallis (British, 1855-1942)
Three Sailing Boats, Two Steamers
Three Steamers
(to reverse)
pencil on paper
c. 1941
25.5 x 39.5cm. Wooden box frame, double-sided glass.

£5,400


Provenance: From the Derwent Scrapbook given to Wallis by Ben Nicholson; Ben Nicholson thence to Denis Mitchell.

Alfred Wallis was a mariner, ice cream maker, ships' supplies merchant and rag-and-bone man before taking up painting in his 70s after his wife died. His unique, untutored vision in many senses marked the start of the back-to-nature instinctive stance of Modern British art, following his 'discovery' by Christopher Wood and Ben Nicholson in St Ives in 1928 and after the benefaction of Jim Ede of Kettle's Yard. Wallis himself revealed that he painted his memories of his seafaring life in order to preserve the past: "What I do mosley is what use to Bee out of my own memory what we may never see again as thing are altered." Nowhere is this more true than in the present drawing, made after Wallis was confined to the Poorhouse in the 1940s on paper given to him by Nicholson.


Eric Ward. Towards the Church at St. Ives



Eric Ward (British, b. 1945)
Towards the Church at St. Ives
Oil on panel
Signed
26 x 31cm. Painted wood frame with gilt.

£400


Eric Ward was born in 1945 in St. Ives, where he has lived for most of his life. After leaving school, he worked as a fisherman until 1985 when he became St. Ives Harbour Master. In 1964 he joined the RNLI as a St. Ives Lifeboatman, was promoted to Coxswain in 1989 and retired after 34 years of service in 2000. Always interested in art, Eric started painting in 1987 at the St. Ives School of Painting. Since then his work has been shown widely, and he has expanded into etching. In 1996 BBC2 featured Eric’s life, “Oils and Oilskins”, on Video Diaries. A year in the making, the programme was acclaimed by The Times. This year, Halsgrove published a large-format 144-page book including over 100 paintings in full colour, 'Eric Ward’s St. Ives: From His Studio and Beyond'.

Ward’s paintings and etchings lovingly portray timeless imagery; the female figure, warm interiors, and sunny harbour scenes appear throughout his work. His pieces have a natural ease and vitality with active light.

 

Eric Ward. Silvery Morning at St. Ives



Eric Ward (British, b. 1945)
Silvery morning at St. Ives
Oil on canvas
Signed
26 x 31cm. Painted wood frame with gilt.

SOLD



Eric Ward. Barbara Hepworth Garden, St. Ives



Eric Ward (British, b. 1945)
Barbara Hepworth Garden
Etching on handmade paper
Signed, titled and numbered from edition of 150
38.5 x 29 cm.

£70
(unframed); £120 (framed) SOLD


Linda Weir. Lilies, Alfies snake vase



Linda Weir (British, b. 1951)
Lilies, alfies snake vase, St. Ives
2006
Oil on canvas
Signed with initials, dated '06
Additionally inscribed on reverse
49 x 20cm. White wood frame.

£795

Linda Weir has taught fine art at the University of Nottingham and Manchester Metropolitan University, and moved to St Ives relatively recently. She has now become known for her vivid oils of the town brimming with life, and has exhibited at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition.


Karl Weschke. Black and Brown



Karl Weschke (German, 1925-2005)
Black and Brown
1958
Lithograph on wove paper
Inscribed 'artist's proof', signed and dated '58 by the artist in pencil
artist's proof aside from the edition of 30
printed by Stanley Jones, St. Ives and published by Robert Erskine, St. George's Gallery
465 x 334mm; 18 1/4 x 13 1/8 in.
Framed in wood.
A rare and important lithograph, from the formative stage of Weschke’s career. Another example (also a proof) of this print is in the Tate Gallery Collection.

SOLD

Weschke first came to Britain as a German Prisoner of War in 1945, and moved down to West Cornwall in 1955 in the footsteps of his friend Bryan Wynter. His first works, including this lithograph, owe something to the angular starkness of Wynter’s early landscapes. Wynter introduced him to the St Ives modernists, and found him lodgings in Zennor, in the cottages where D.H. Lawrence had once stayed.

Though principally a figurative painter Weschke began painting in Cornwall in an abstract idiom. He modified his palette to earth tones, dark and potentially menacing, which would characterise all his future work. The present work is among the first to demonstrate this shift in colour, and the effect this abstract experimentation had upon his work. Though at first glance abstract, this lithograph has much in common with the landscape-based abstraction of Peter Lanyon in its evocation of the spirit of a place by transcending concrete physical realisation. Thus there is the suggestion of the strata of rocks, of a barren landscape viewed at night; yet the overwhelming sensations of darkness, loneliness, of menace, violence even – Weschke’s central themes – are the greater for not being constrained by the visual imagery. Like Lanyon too, Weschke’s abstract landscapes from the late 50s begin to yield up suggestions of the human figure, which become more explicit in his later work. Weschke’s friendship with Francis Bacon, who visited him in Cornwall at around this time, is telling in this respect, as well as in terms of the latent violence and oppressive colouration of this print. Perhaps the greatest influence though on Weschke throughout his career was German Expressionism, and that tradition lurks behind the darkness and the ultimately autobiographical pursuit of feeling.


Christopher Wood. Standing Woman



Christopher Wood (British, 1901-1930)
Standing woman.
Pencil and pastel.
faintly signed
49 x 31.5cm. White box frame.

Provenance: Henry Gilbert, The Wills Lane Gallery, St. Ives, Cornwall; Christie's sale, June 4th 1971. From an early portfolio in the possession of the Wood family.
£5,200


This delightful full-length portrait of a young woman by Christopher Wood (1901-1930) depicts the figure in a relaxed pose, appearing to lean against a wall with her legs crossed and her right arm resting on a plinth. The arrangement of her hair and the style of her dress indicate that the drawing was probably created by Wood in the last years of his life during the later 1920s. Wood employs a beautifully controlled line to delineate his sitter’s belted dress, her arms, hands, legs and feet in their high heels. It is only for her face that he uses shading to impart volume and modelling, to capture her composed, interior gaze and her gently inclined head.

Portraits of girls and young women played a significant part in Wood’s oeuvre, and at their finest they are some of his most powerful works. Although perhaps best-known for his coastal scenes of Brittany and Cornwall, it was in these female portraits, and particularly in his drawings on this subject, that he attained the greatest stillness and thoughtfulness to be found in his small output. Addicted to opium, Wood died under a train at Salisbury station aged only twenty-nine.

 

Christopher Wood. Bridge on the Thames



Christopher Wood (British, 1901-1930)
Bridge on the Thames
charcoal
22.2 x 28.2 cm. (8 3/4 x 11 1/4 in.)
Executed in 1923 (according to a label on the backboard). Framed in wood.

Reference:Eric Newton, Christopher Wood 1901-1930, The Redfern Gallery, London, 1938, p.78, cat.no.508 (recorded).

£1,650

This drawing of Battersea Bridge has been identified by the artist's nephew as being the view from his flat on the Embankment.


Fred Yates. Northern Street Scene

Fred Yates (British, 1922-2008)
Northern Street Scene
Giclée print in colours
Signed and numbered from limited edition of 95
46 x 60cm. White box frame.

£495
 

Born in 1922, Fred Yates grew up in Urmston, a suburb of Manchester. His career as an insurance clerk was cut short by the outbreak of the war and he served in the Grenadier Guards until 1945 when he returned to Manchester as a painter and decorator.

Untutored, but with tremendous self-discipline, he began to paint pictures of the rich industrial architecture of Manchester, the red brick terraces and the commotion and humour of street life - a theme that is apparent even in his most recent work. He subsequently enrolled on a teacher training course at Bournemouth College of Art and in 1950 won a travelling scholarship to Rome and Florence.

He taught for over twenty years battling continuously against artistic sophistication; for him, beauty resided in "simplicity and a child's mind." In 1969, Fred gave up teaching and moved to Cornwall to enable him to devote all his time to painting. While he still painted scenes remembered from his childhood in Manchester, he also worked on sunnier landscapes.

His paintings are held in a number of private and public collections including Brighton and Hove Art Gallery, Liverpool University, The University of Warwick, Torquay Art Gallery and Russell Coates Gallery, Bournemouth.


Fred Yates. Cafe de Paris

Fred Yates (British, 1922-2008)
Café de Paris
Giclée print in colours
Signed and numbered from limited edition of 95
46 x 60cm. White box frame.

SOLD



Fred Yates. The accordion player

Fred Yates (British, 1922-2008)

The Accordion Player
Giclée print in colours
Signed and numbered from limited edition of 125
31 x 38cm. White box frame.

£350


Fred Yates. Man on Stilts




Fred Yates (British, 1922-2008)

Man on Stilts
Giclée print in colours
Signed and numbered from limited edition of 125
38 x 32cm.

£350


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